Resource

New Data Estimate Nearly 62.8 Million Women Have Coverage of Birth Control without Out-of-Pocket Costs

The National Women’s Law Center has calculated new 2018 estimates that nearly 62.8 million women have insurance coverage of birth control without out-of-pocket costs as required by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This is approximately seven million more women than the most recent estimates provided by the Department of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in May 2015. This new data is further evidence that the ACA is working and continues to improve the lives of individuals across the country, despite attempts to repeal it and sabotage its implementation.

The ACA requires most health plans to cover a set of preventive services without out-of-pocket costs, including a specific group of preventive services for women, like birth control, well-woman visits, and breastfeeding support and supplies. The birth control benefit is an incredibly popular part of the ACA and is improving women’s health and economic security across the country. Without out-of-pocket costs as a barrier to birth control, some women are able to use prescription birth control for the first time and others are finally able to use more effective, longer-acting – but more expensive – methods of birth control.

 

Estimated Number of Americans With Preventive Services Coverage with Zero Cost Sharing
State Children (<17 years) Women (18-64 years) Men (18-64 years) Total (0-64 years)
U.S. 39,451,146 62,773,531 61,317,399 163,543,756
Alabama 500,835 896,422 843,555 2,240,812
Alaska 73,077 120,699 122,205 315,982
Arizona 815,647 1,200,385 1,166,275 3,183,147
Arkansas 355,828 513,558 494,502 1,364,727
California* 4,555,831 7,379,378 7,532,895 19,467,264
Colorado* 747,659 1,146,628 1,147,338 3,041,625
Connecticut* 431,796 716,580 663,527 1,811,903
Delaware 107,453 195,736 186,960 490,149
District of Columbia* 71,824 160,170 144,795 377,629
Florida 2,176,734 4,019,930 3,796,984 9,993,647
Georgia 1,159,627 2,019,949 1,775,860 4,955,435
Hawaii 172,667 257,138 276,737 706,542
Idaho* 246,010 331,497 326,285 903,792
Illinois 1,772,232 2,614,063 2,632,577 7,018,032
Indiana 888,736 1,322,518 1,269,699 3,481,793
Iowa 443,099 649,986 647,176 1,740,261
Kansas 378,193 550,203 529,456 1,458,693
Kentucky 517,104 824,859 810,835 2,152,798
Louisiana 468,792 771,818 682,612 1,923,223
Maine 144,141 259,591 230,447 634,179
Maryland* 770,879 1,242,742 1,224,267 3,237,888
Massachusetts* 817,090 1,535,092 1,519,782 3,871,964
Michigan 1,286,539 1,899,995 1,913,092 5,099,625
Minnesota* 829,068 1,126,759 1,141,716 3,097,544
Mississippi 285,973 523,398 475,902 1,285,273
Missouri 840,166 1,227,546 1,181,387 3,249,098
Montana 121,157 187,313 190,673 499,143
Nebraska 271,781 363,871 362,629 998,281
Nevada 359,154 548,528 527,398 1,435,080
New Hampshire 164,880 287,920 290,003 742,804
New Jersey 1,173,036 1,860,476 1,855,445 4,888,117
New Mexico 178,662 293,988 275,589 748,239
New York* 2,239,286 3,898,562 3,898,770 10,035,778
North Carolina 1,089,208 2,043,338 1,896,331 5,028,877
North Dakota 107,166 145,589 159,108 411,863
Ohio 1,614,045 2,296,667 2,277,461 6,188,173
Oklahoma 452,602 713,504 692,059 1,857,325
Oregon 491,736 814,189 831,876 2,137,802
Pennsylvania 1,497,824 2,544,007 2,461,908 6,503,739
Rhode Island* 116,309 225,637 227,718 569,664
South Carolina 555,795 915,636 834,378 2,305,809
South Dakota 122,165 152,520 170,883 445,568
Tennessee 716,962 1,248,215 1,186,930 3,151,267
Texas 3,524,294 5,111,516 4,966,397 13,602,207
Utah 630,003 653,334 645,056 1,928,393
Vermont 71,810 126,057 127,540 325,407
Virginia 1,114,998 1,699,267 1,607,591 4,422,696
Washington* 938,512 1,539,361 1,504,977 3,983,690
West Virginia* 176,774 290,804 300,487 768,065
Wisconsin 789,258 1,195,313 1,181,731 3,166,301
Wyoming 76,729 111,282 107,591 296,443

 

Source: NWLC calculations based on U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS), 2018 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), 2018 Marketplace Open Enrollment Period Public Use Files. *CMS has limited data for these states by demographic group on the number of newly enrolled individuals. A national proxy was used to determine these estimates.

Methodology: Figures are derived by summing the number of non-elderly individuals with ungrandfathered private health coverage, obtained from the most recent Census Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and the number of individuals newly enrolled in marketplace coverage during the most recent open enrollment period, obtained from CMS open enrollment data.

CPS data on private health insurance coverage are from 2017 and are the most recent data available. This analysis assumes that most individuals who reported private health coverage in 2017 continue to have similar private coverage in 2018. The number of individuals enrolled in ungrandfathered private health plans was estimated from CPS health insurance data. This estimate is also based on the Kaiser Family Foundation findings that 84 percent of individuals with employer-based coverage were in ungrandfathered plans that are required to cover recommended preventive services with zero cost sharing. This analysis assumes that the proportion of those in grandfathered plans with any private insurance is the same as those with employment-based insurance.

New marketplace enrollment data from the 2018 OEP report were reported by age and gender for only 39 states. Total newly enrolled marketplace figures and figures for men and women include persons over 65 years old, who make up equal to or less than 1% of total marketplace enrollment in most states. In eleven states (CA, CO, CT, ID, MD, MA, MN, NY, RI, WA, VT) and the District of Columbia, where new enrollment by either age or gender was not reported, NWLC estimated the number of new marketplace enrollments for women, men, and children by multiplying the numbers of newly enrolled persons (reported for all 50 states and D.C.) for these states by their proportion of national new enrollment. For example, women make up 53 percent, children make up 11 percent, and elderly persons make up 1 percent of all new marketplace enrollments nationally. To estimate the new enrollment of adult, non-elderly women in New York, we multiplied the overall number of new marketplace enrollees by 11 percent to calculate the estimated number of children (6,566) and by 1 percent to calculate the estimated number of elderly (age 65 and older) persons (597) newly enrolled in marketplace plans. The estimates for children and elderly adults were subtracted from the total number of new enrollees, resulting in the total number of adult, non-elderly persons (52,532) ages 18 to 64. This estimate was then multiplied by 53 percent (the national percent of new female enrollees), resulting in the total number of adult, non-elderly women (27,842) newly enrolled in marketplace plans.

 

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