Resource

New Data Estimate 62.4 Million Women Have Coverage of Birth Control without Out-of-Pocket Costs

The National Women’s Law Center has calculated new 2017 estimates that 62.4 million women have insurance coverage of birth control without out-of-pocket costs as required by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This is approximately seven million more women than the most recent estimates provided by the Department of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in May 2015. This new data is further evidence that the ACA is working and continues to improve the lives of individuals across the country, despite attempts to repeal it and sabotage its implementation.

The ACA requires most health plans to cover a set of preventive services without out-of-pocket costs, including a specific group of preventive services for women, like birth control, well-woman visits, and breastfeeding support and supplies. The birth control benefit is an incredibly popular part of the ACA and is improving women’s health and economic security across the country. Without out-of-pocket costs as a barrier to birth control, some women are able to use prescription birth control for the first time and others are finally able to use more effective, longer-acting – but more expensive – methods of birth control.

Estimated Number of Americans With Preventive Services Coverage with Zero Cost Sharing
State Children (<17 years) Women (18-64 years) Men (18-64 years) Total (0-64 years)
U.S. 38,914,942 62,418,883 59,986,981 161,320,807
Alabama 514,960 906,514 881,503 2,302,977
Alaska 84,773 117,286 113,755 315,813
Arizona 752,461 1,160,152 1,148,584 3,061,198
Arkansas 360,700 553,855 503,730 1,418,285
California* 4,504,260 7,434,307 7,425,647 19,364,214
Colorado* 723,300 1,073,462 1,080,025 2,876,787
Connecticut* 408,101 756,856 730,089 1,895,045
Delaware 107,283 175,229 158,123 440,635
District of Columbia* 61,345 152,600 143,938 357,883
Florida 2,165,750 4,046,373 3,689,400 9,901,522
Georgia 1,139,564 2,080,165 1,878,673 5,098,402
Hawaii 182,248 266,629 274,175 723,052
Idaho* 241,016 328,129 320,972 890,117
Illinois 1,665,800 2,516,968 2,450,162 6,632,930
Indiana 905,697 1,300,230 1,248,608 3,454,535
Iowa 407,217 627,233 628,274 1,662,724
Kansas 417,748 566,861 564,118 1,548,728
Kentucky 535,936 851,396 823,234 2,210,566
Louisiana 440,263 792,675 721,997 1,954,935
Maine 123,362 253,171 262,491 639,025
Maryland* 802,846 1,293,244 1,155,483 3,251,573
Massachusetts* 808,130 1,402,434 1,373,257 3,583,821
Michigan 1,207,054 1,948,285 1,975,029 5,130,368
Minnesota* 897,925 1,127,132 1,105,318 3,130,374
Mississippi 304,664 525,517 449,104 1,279,286
Missouri 810,199 1,200,690 1,075,411 3,086,300
Montana 113,553 187,974 186,901 488,428
Nebraska 286,585 374,458 374,860 1,035,903
Nevada 380,662 532,182 532,043 1,444,887
New Hampshire 160,560 287,678 279,723 727,961
New Jersey 1,151,436 1,795,160 1,840,628 4,787,224
New Mexico 180,051 308,113 285,573 773,737
New York* 2,301,739 3,855,517 3,705,315 9,862,572
North Carolina 1,147,785 1,999,751 1,803,292 4,950,829
North Dakota 103,386 147,419 160,699 411,504
Ohio 1,420,607 2,208,431 2,246,307 5,875,346
Oklahoma 449,636 720,705 704,435 1,874,776
Oregon 460,685 785,597 829,399 2,075,681
Pennsylvania 1,592,962 2,681,624 2,534,229 6,808,815
Rhode Island* 117,638 212,570 224,728 554,936
South Carolina 565,251 938,420 866,945 2,370,616
South Dakota 121,955 147,664 174,740 444,359
Tennessee 735,579 1,205,427 1,132,941 3,073,947
Texas 3,509,301 5,141,581 4,938,793 13,589,675
Utah 604,813 599,756 618,846 1,823,414
Vermont 80,151 181,585 168,978 430,715
Virginia 1,059,759 1,635,838 1,496,916 4,192,513
Washington* 839,234 1,455,333 1,418,962 3,713,529
West Virginia* 179,383 291,136 303,969 774,488
Wisconsin 696,491 1,157,642 1,208,416 3,062,548
Wyoming 83,139 109,927 113,857 306,923

 

Source: NWLC calculations based on U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS), 2017 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), 2017 Marketplace Open Enrollment Period Public Use Files. *CMS has limited data for these states by demographic group on the number of newly enrolled individuals. A national proxy was used to determine these estimates.

Methodology: Figures are derived by summing the number of non-elderly individuals with ungrandfathered private health coverage, obtained from most recent Census Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and the number of individuals newly enrolled in marketplace coverage during the most recent open enrollment period (OEP), obtained from CMS open enrollment data.

CPS data on private health insurance coverage are from 2016 and are the most recent data available. This analysis assumes that most individuals who reported private health coverage in 2016 continue to have similar private coverage in 2017. The number of individuals enrolled in ungrandfathered private health plans was estimated from CPS health insurance data, and is based on Kaiser Family Foundation findings that 83 percent with employer based coverage were in ungrandfathered plans that are required to cover recommended preventive services with zero cost sharing. This analysis assumes that the proportion of those in grandfathered plans with any private insurance is the same as those with employment based insurance.

New marketplace enrollment data from the 2017 OEP report were reported by age and gender for only 39 states. Total newly enrolled marketplace figures and figures for men and women include persons over 65 years old, who make up equal to or less than 1% of total marketplace enrollment in most states. In states where new enrollment by age or gender was not reported (CA, CO, CT, DC, ID, MD, MA, MN, NY, RI, WA, WV), NWLC estimated the number of new marketplace enrollments for women, men, and children by multiplying the numbers of newly enrolled persons (reported for all 50 states and D.C.) for these states by their proportion of national new enrollment. For example, women make up 57 percent of all new marketplace enrollments nationally. To estimate new enrollment in California we multiplied the overall number for new marketplace enrollments by 57 percent to get 195,235 women newly enrolled in marketplace plans. This analysis assumes that the proportion of women, men, and children newly enrolled in the marketplace are similar to national averages. However, these estimates may be higher or lower than actual enrollment for women, men or children in those states.