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Let Her Learn: Resources for Students

You Can Make a Difference: Sign the Pledge

Our Let Her Learn: Stopping School Pushout reports show that too many girls are being pushed out of school because of unfair discipline practices, or because they’re not getting the support they need to deal with trauma and other challenges they face. Take the Let Her Learn pledge, and find out how students like you can help end school pushout here.

 

8 Questions to Help You Figure Out if Your School’s Dress Code is Fair

Find out if your school’s dress code and discipline policy is fair. Actions must be made to stop school push out, and your school’s discipline policy could be a huge culprit.

Let Her Learn_Suspension rates for women of color

 

 

 

It’s Just My Face

Maybe I don’t smile as much as everyone else; it doesn’t mean I have an attitude. It’s the face I have when I’m relaxed. It’s the face I have when I’m alone or when I’m with others. It’s just my face. Do you have to comment on it? Why actually make me mad when there is nothing I’m even mad about?

 

 

My School District Over-Punishes Girls of Color. Does Yours?

For girls of color especially, being suspended for small things like dress code violations or chewing gum was all too common for us. I thought campus security intruding during class and escorting students out was normal, but wow, I was wrong!”

 

 

Trauma and Learning: A Student’s Perspective

Trauma isn’t a buzzword or an excuse — it’s a real and common obstacle that makes it difficult for girls to learn. Trauma makes it hard to feel safe enough to trust others, or focus on work. Instead, girls’ minds might replay scary memories of bad things that happened, or constantly scan for people and things that might hurt them. They might miss school because they don’t feel safe there, or while going to and from school.

 

No, I wasn’t angry or mean. I was just a Black girl.

Maybe I don’t smile as much as everyone else; it doesn’t mean I have an attitude. It’s the face I have when I’m relaxed. It’s the face I have when I’m alone or when I’m with others. It’s just my face. Do you have to comment on it? Why actually make me mad when there is nothing I’m even mad about?

 

 

The Miseducation of Black Women, No Lauryn Hill

Anti-blackness is a powerful force in our nation’s schools. It shapes policy, practices, expectations, and school culture. During the course of my K-12 education, I became familiar with the kind of anti-Blackness and systemic inequality in our education system.