Maps

In almost every state working women are at least twice as likely as men to have a low-wage job—and in some states they are almost three times as likely.

  • Nationally working women in the United States are more than twice as likely as working men to have a low-wage job.
  • A working woman is at least twice as likely to have a low-wage job as a working man in all but three states (Nevada, Hawaii, and California) and the District of Columbia—and even in these jurisdictions, the share of working women in the low-wage workforce is at least 1.5 times that of men.
  • A working woman is more than 2.5 times as likely to have a low-wage job as a working man in nine states: Indiana, Maine, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, Wyoming, Louisiana, and West Virginia.
  • The states with the largest gender disparity between women and men in the low-wage workforce are West Virginia and Louisiana. In West Virginia the share of working women who have low-wage jobs (22.8 percent) is 2.9 times the share of working men who have low-wage jobs (7.8 percent)

Learn About Tableau

For more national and state data on women in the low-wage workforce and for policy recommendations on how to improve the lives of low-wage workers, see NWLC’s new report Underpaid & Overloaded: Women in Low-Wage Jobs: www.nwlc.org/LowWage.

Also check out our interactive graphic that lets you compare women’s and men’s shares of the low-wage and overall workforces.

Click here for tables with data on women in the low-wage workforce by state.

Notes: Figures are for employed workers. The low-wage workforce is defined here as occupations with median wages of $10.10 or less per hour based on BLS, Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2013.

Source of state data: NWLC calculations of American Community Survey (ACS) 2008-2012 five-year averages using Steven Ruggles, et al., Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS): Version 5.0 [Machine-readable database] (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2010).

Published On: July 30, 2014Associated Issues: Low-Wage JobsWorkplace