Women overall working full time, year round in the United States are paid only 79 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts. But the wage gap is even larger for Latinas who work full time, year round—they are paid only 55 cents for every dollar paid to white, non-Hispanic men. This gap, which amounts to a loss of $25,177 a year, means that Latinas have to work 22 months—until the end of October—to make as much as white, non-Hispanic men did last year alone.

Latinas experience a wage gap at every education level—and it is widest among those with the least education.

  • Among full-time, year-round workers, Latinas without a high school degree typically make only 58 cents for every dollar white, non-Hispanic men without a high school degree make.
  • Latinas must obtain a bachelor’s degree or more before their typical wages exceed those of white, non-Hispanic men without a bachelor’s degree. Latinas with a bachelor’s degree or more make $50,952—
    essentially the same as white, non-Hispanic men with some college but no degree ($1.01 for every $1). Latinas with only an associate’s degree typically make less—by about $3,500—than white, non-Hispanic men without a high school degree (90 cents for every dollar).

Latinas’ wage gap is wider among older women.

  • Among full-time, year-round workers ages 15-24, Latinas typically make 73 cents for every dollar white, non-Hispanic men make—but this figure is far worse for older women. Among workers 25-44 it is 60 cents and among those 45-64 it is 50 cents.4 These larger gaps mean that Latinas are falling behind at the very time they need additional resources to invest in their families and save for retirement.
  • Based on today’s wage gap, over the course of a 40-year career, Latinas typically lose $1,007,080 to the wage gap—this means Latinas would have to work 73 years to earn what white, non-Hispanic men earned in 40 years.

Latinas experience a wage gap across occupations.

  • In a wide variety of occupations—those that are well-paid and poorly paid, those that are female- dominated and those that are non-traditional for women—Latinas working full time, year round make less than white, non-Hispanic men.
    • Latinas working as physicians and surgeons—a traditionally male, high-wage occupation—make 46 cents for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.
    • Latinas working as customer service representatives—a mid-wage, female-dominated occupation—make 75 cents for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.
    • Latinas working as construction laborers—a traditionally male, mid-wage occupation—make 69 cents for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.
    • Latinas working as personal care aides—a heavily female, low-wage occupation—make 77 cents for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.
  • In addition to wage gaps within occupations, Latinas are overrepresented in some of the most poorly paid jobs in the nation. Latinas’ share of the low-wage workforce (14.7 percent) is more than double their share of the overall workforce (6.8 percent). Even in these low-wage occupations that typically pay $10.50 per hour or less, Latinas working full time, year round experience a wage gap, making only 67 cents for every dollar white, non-Hispanic men make.

Latinas’ wage gap has persisted over decades.

  • In 1974, the earliest year for which data are available, Latinas working full time, year round typically made only 49 cents for every dollar paid to her white, non-Hispanic male counterpart.
  • By 2014, the most recent year for which data are available, that gap had narrowed by 6 cents and Latinas working full time, year round were still only paid 55 cents for every dollar paid to their white, non-Hispanic male counterparts.

Latinas’ wage gap is substantially wider in some states.

  • In 17 states and D.C., Latinas typically make less than half of what white, non-Hispanic men make.
  • In 2013, the most recent year for which data are available, Latinas in California had the worst wage gap in the country at 56 cents,10 even though in 2014 women overall in California had the eighth smallest wage gap at just 16 cents.
Published On: October 12, 2015Associated Issues: Equal Pay and the Wage GapMeasuring the Wage GapWorkplace